Dabbing 101 : How To Get Started

Dabbing 101 : How To Get Started

How to get started? By @MedicalAndy


Last week we talked a little bit about the history and basics of dabbing, this week we’ll discuss how you could get started and making sure your cannabis concentrates are safe.

Let me start by saying you SHOULD NOT attempt to make BHO at home.  It is not safe and you could be seriously injured.  There are ways to mitigate the danger but it is still not worth the safety risk (or the legal risk).  If you wish to make small amounts of concentrate at home, I recommend rosin (high pressure, low temperature, no solvents).  Or for growers, invest in a set of bubble bags to make quality hash.

For people in states with cannabis access—look for lab tested concentrates to ensure they have been properly processed.  If lab tested concentrates are not available in your area, look for pre-packaged and branded products by a company you know (most companies are regional but they would have a logo on the package with an accompanying website or Instagram account).  Encourage your dispensary to carry lab tested products if they don’t already.

 

It’s hard to give clear rules for picking out BHO visually, but there are a couple indicators you can look for if you can’t get lab tested concentrates, basically: lighter in color indicates fresher material, and clarity (not cloudy) indicates de-waxing and proper extraction.  It is impossible to tell the level of residual solvent visually.

If you do not have access to quality solvent-processed concentrates (such as BHO), it can be a good health decision to not purchase them at all.  If you enjoy dabbing, considering processing rosin yourself—it can be done safely for under $50 in equipment.  

Before you purchase any concentrates, it’s best to figure out how you’re going to medicate with them.  

  1. Oil rig: Generally small sized bong used with nail for dabbing: Pro: most efficient way to use your concentrates, Con: expensive set up cost

1A.  Convert your existing bong—may be difficult with a larger piece, Pro: Inexpensive, Con: Less pleasant dabbing experience

 

2.  Electronic dabber: Small battery-powered dabbing device, Pro: Convenient, Con: concerns over plastic safety, moderate battery life

 

3.  Pen dabber: Small “vape pen” that can be loaded with concentrate, Pro: Easy on-the-go use, smallest size overall, Con: Less than optimal hit, concerns over material safety, clogs

 

4.  Putting concentrates in a joint or on top of a bowl, Pro: Fun, no set-up cost, Con: Inefficient use

Next week we’ll talk more about how the various types of dab-able oils and hashes, how they’re produced and the differences between them.  This will include discussion of processed oils, including BHO and other hydrocarbons (propane, pentane, etc.), CO2, and distillate; as well as hash products which can be dabbed, including bubble hash (ice wax), dry sift, and rosin.

 

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